Lockport Union-Sun & Journal Online

Columns

June 28, 2013

States should be free to govern themselves

Lockport Union-Sun & Journal — I don’t like being told what to do. I live life by my own rules and I answer to no one but myself. I like it that way. 

I also have no need to tell others what to do. If your morals differ from mine, have a blast — as long as whatever you’re doing isn’t hurting me, who am I to complain?

The United States were founded on these basic principals: You do your thing and I’ll do mine. And as long as your thing doesn’t hurt my thing, I’ll leave you be. 

It’s a standard tenet of freedom. It’s libertarianism in it’s purest form. It’s not anarchy. Anarchy doesn’t care if your thing hurts my thing. Anarchy is survival of the fittest at the expense of the meek. Libertarianism not only allows for, but promotes certain protections against the chaos that anarchy brings.

Back up a minute. Please note that I said “The United States were founded.” Not “was” founded. 

See, people seem to forget that in the rest of the world, “state” and “nation” mean the same thing. We’re supposed to be 50 little countries with our own identities and customs who come together in times of need and have each others’ backs. 

But more and more the states have become nothing more than a bureaucratic arm of the federal government. Washington D.C. is the end-all-be-all and states have to ask permission to use the restroom — figuratively speaking, of course.

An example is the recent ruling by the Supreme Court striking down the Defense of Marriage Act, a federal law enacted during the Clinton administration that allows states to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages performed under the laws of other states.

Before I get into this, I’ll remind you that I am an ardent supporter of same-sex marriages. 

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